Deluxe Entertainment: Additional Info About Credit Troubles

In a broader article by Bloomberg BusinessWeek about the CLO market, was a useful backgrounder on what happened to Deluxe Entertainment Group that caused the company to recently file for bankruptcy:

Deluxe Entertainment Services Group Inc. shows just how quickly liquidity in the leveraged loan market can evaporate. A postproduction media services company for the film industry, Deluxe has struggled with a changing digital media landscape in Hollywood and an increasingly burdensome debt load. But with tens of billions pouring into the leveraged loan market and a CLO machine cranking out deal after deal, Deluxe and its owner, Ronald Perelman’s MacAndrews & Forbes, had little trouble in recent years raising new debt to keep the company afloat.

Deluxe refinanced its debt in 2014, getting enough demand from investors that it was able to upsize its loan by $35 million, to $605 million, and cut its interest rate by a full percentage point. Two years later, the company returned to the market for an additional $75 million, and it tacked on $200 million more in 2017 to refinance some of its other debt.

But as Deluxe’s problems mounted, its cash thinned. After an unsuccessful effort to sell its creative services unit, it turned to its existing lenders, who agreed to back a $73 million loan in July. That’s when it got ugly. The news of the abandoned sale and new debt caused the value of Deluxe’s loan—with $768 million still outstanding—to plunge from 89¢ on the dollar to less than 40¢ in some 24 hours. Within about a week, S&P downgraded its rating by three notches, to CCC-. The downgrade blocked some existing CLO lenders, bound by the 7.5% limit, from fronting additional cash. On Oct. 3, the company filed for Chapter 11. The existing loan now trades at less than 10¢ on the dollar. Deluxe said in a statement that “We appreciate the support we have received from our lenders throughout this process and look forward to completing the refinancing shortly.”

With BDC earnings season coming round, we’ll shortly learn how Harvest Capital (HCAP), Cion Investment and TP Flexible Income Fund, with $20.7mn invested in the bankrupt company as of June have navigated this complex situation. We expect substantial losses to be booked this quarter or next and – possibly – an increase in invested capital.