TridentUSA Health Services: Written Off

Ares Capital (ARCC) – the largest BDC lender to TridentUSA Health Services (also known as New Trident Holdcorp and Trident Health Services) – has taken a 100% realized loss on its non-performing debt outstanding to the company, which filed for bankruptcy back in February, and which we discussed in a post on September 30, 2019. The loss was realized in the IIIQ 2019. This has a resulted in a major loss for the BDC: $96mn. Moreover, that means 3 other BDCs with another $12mn of exposure are likely to be taking similar write-offs when their results are published: Gladstone Capital (GLAD), Solar Senior Capital (SUNS) and Oaktree Strategic Income (OCSI).

What’s more, back in IVQ 2017 when the company first went on non-accrual other BDCs, such as PennantPark Floating (PFLT) and Investcorp Credit Management BDC (ICMB) had positions as well. In fact, total BDC exposure was $157mn at its peak but only $108mn as of June 2019 when the debt had all been effectively written down on an unrealized basis to zero. We expect those departed BDCs took some sort of realized loss to depart the scene early. If the other BDCs lenders still involved follow ARCC’s path, SUNS will be losing ($7.7mn), GLAD ($4.4mn) and OCSI well under ($1mn). About $12mn of investment income that was being charged will be lost.

This is a credit that dates back to 2013 for ARCC (and other involved) when the BDC giant made a $80mn second lien investment. The debt was added to the under-performing list in the IIQ 2016. The valuation went up and down from there, including rising at one point on the hope of a sale. However, by IVQ 2017, the second lien debt was placed on non accrual. ARCC advanced $16mn in additional debt, on a first lien basis. In the spring of 2018 new debt was advanced and existing debt renegotiated, which Moody’s deemed to be “a distressed exchange” and downgraded the company. Finally, in February 2019 the New Trident filed for Chapter 11. By then most BDCs had written down their exposure 100% or close to.

What went wrong ? You’d be hard pressed to find out from ARCC – which prides itself on its transparency – from the latest Conference Call transcript. Management only discussed the company in response to a question, describing the investment as “unsuccessful” and the amount lost as “pretty substantial”. We’d agree with that last assessment: $96mn is equal to 1.3% of ARCC’s equity capital at par and is equivalent to 45% of this quarter’s Net Investment Income.

We know that the company and its subsidiaries is owned by private equity sponsors Formation Capital, Audax Group, and Revelstoke Capital Partners and that annual revenues are approximately $500 million, according to Moody’s. A couple of BDCs have been quick to say the health care company’s problems were “idiosyncratic” but the bankruptcy has occurred at a time when both the BDC Credit Reporter and rating groups have noticed a deterioration in the sector more generally – a grave concern considering the ubiquity of health care related credits in leveraged lending.