Constellis Holdings: Restructuring Underway

We warned in an earlier article on October 9, 2019 that for Constellis Holdings “a day of reckoning is coming – and fast”. Judging from two major – and related – developments, the time is nigh. On January 3, 2020 the Wall Street Journal reported the troubled security company “is in talks with creditors on a deal to restructure its $1 billion of debt, according to people with knowledge of the discussions”. Darkly, unnamed sources, warned that if an out of court restructuring didn’t happen, a “pre-packaged” Chapter 11 filing was also on the table. (That’s all part of the negotiation process in these kind of deals as interested parties suddenly find their way to the phone to confide to journalists, who are themselves happy to be of service).

We also learned that the company failed to make a scheduled principal payment on December 31 and has received a short term forbearance from its lenders.

At the same time, Moody’s went and downgraded the company’s corporate rating to Ca, and re-rated several debt tranches outstanding. Most worrying of all is that Moody’s reports that the company’s finances suddenly deteriorated in the last quarter of the year, resulting in a “liquidity crunch”.

All of which suggests the Day of Reckoning is here for the 8 BDCs with nearly $107mn in debt exposure at various points in the company’s balance sheet. Just one month ago, one of those BDC lenders – OFS Capital or OFS – waxed relatively optimistic about the outlook for Constellis: ” I want to note that the company is current on its payments. And based on discussions with management, they have stressed that they have adequate liquidity to fund operations. The company has a growing backlog and expects sequential performance improvement. The sponsor has substantial amount of cash invested in this business, and we expect continued focus from the sponsor”.

We now know that at least some of those reassurances are no longer true. This is reflected in the public prices of the outstanding debt as provided by Advantage Data. The 2022 Term Loan is trading at a (57%) discount, versus (14%) at September 30, 2019. The second lien debt is worth only 10 cents on the dollar in the market, down from 25 cents. At 9/30/2019 FMV was still around $84mn, down ($23mn) from cost. Now, we wouldn’t be surprised to see further losses of ($30mn)-($40mn) more at FMV and ultimate Realized Losses – which could crystallize very soon – of nearly ($75mn). Add to that the loss of income and you’ve got the first bona fide major set-back for BDC lenders in 2020 , should there be no last minute rescue.

As we’ve noted before, the bulk of the exposure – and thus any damage – will be concentrated in the four non-listed FS-KKR BDCs – CCT II, FSIC II, FSIC III and FSIC IV. This was a borrower that the group jumped into under the KKR regime, bringing BDC exposure from modest ($12mn) to major, when they initiated exposure in the IVQ 2018. Maybe the far sighted folk at the jointly run asset manager have their eyes on becoming equity owners of Constellis, but we don’t think so as Advantage Data’s records show the debt was purchased at a cost very close to par, and before the current downturn in corporate fortunes.

We’ll probably be learning a lot about the company’s plans and the impact on its various lenders very soon and will be able to make a better assessment. At this point, though, with a potential loss range of $75mn-$100mn in a down case, this looks like a major credit reverse is on its way.