California Pizza Kitchen: Files Chapter 11

On July 30, 2020 California Pizza Kitchen (aka CPK) filed for Chapter 11, as part of a broad restructuring plan (RSA) agreed with its first lien lenders. As readers will expect by now, the RSA envisages a “debt for equity swap” and additional financing to get the restaurant company through this difficult period, presumably financed by some or all those same lenders that are in the existing financing. CPK hopes to be in and out of bankruptcy in 3 months.

The BDC Credit Reporter has written about the company on three prior occasions. Our most recent contribution followed learning that several BDC lenders had placed their debt outstanding to the business on non accrual, but not all. In any case, bankruptcy has seemed like a forgone conclusion for some time. As a result, the seven BDCs involved (6 of whom are publicly traded) will have to face the consequences of their $48.1mn invested in the debt of CPK.

Common sense suggests the second lien debt holders : Great Elm Corporation (GECC) and Capitala Finance (CPTA) will have to write off the $4.1mn and $4.9mn respectively held. The rest of the debt is in first lien debt (including a tranche held by GECC) and will mostly become non income producing, when swapped for common shares. We expect the BDCs involved will write off 80% or more of their positions, but we’ll gather more details shortly. As usual in these situations, total exposure may increase as some of the lenders fund their share of the additional capital. For the record, the other BDCs involved are Main Street (MAIN); Capital Southwest (CSWC); Monroe Capital (MRCC) and Oaktree Specialty Lending (OCSL) ; as well as non traded TP Flexible Income with a tiny position.

CPK is – arguably an example of a “Second Wave” credit default. Admittedly, the company was already underperforming before Covid-19 but would likely not have had to file Chapter 11 if the virus had not occurred. As recently as the IIQ 2019 GECC – in a case of ill timing – bought into the second lien at a (5%) discount to par. Going forward, a much de-leveraged CPK should have a decent chance of survival, and may even thrive in the long run. This might allow the BDCs involved to recoup some of their capital but it’s going to be a long slog.

Currently, the BDC Reporter has rated CPK CCR 5 – or non performing – which remains unchanged. We’ll re-rate the company when the RSA – or some other outcome – is finalized. By the way, this is the ninth BDC-financed company to file for bankruptcy – all Chapter 11 – in the month of July, keeping up the blistering pace set in June.